Interview with Alpin’s Cofounders – Colorado Security Podcast

Recently, two of our co-founders, Mark Evans and Ben Soulier, were interviewed by Alex Wood at the popular Colorado = Security podcast.

 

Below, we’ve transcribed the Podcast if you want to scan and get the gist. If you’re interested in listening, look up Colorado Security on your favorite podcast app, listen to episode 102, and jump to about 27 minutes and 40 seconds in to hear the interview with Mark and Ben.

 

What are some highlights?

 

• Learn more about Alpin’s founding and story

• Get the lowdown on why companies use Alpin

• See how Alpin fits in the security landscape with CASBs, firewalls and more

• Listen to Mark and Ben discuss their vision for the future

– Upcoming features for the App

– What’s next for Alpin the company

 

 

Colorado = Security with Founders @ Alpin

 

Note: this transcript was generated by a transcription service  and may contain errors or inaccuracies.

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

Welcome to Colorado equals security. We have our feature interview today. We have a couple of very special guests with us.  we have Ben Soulier and Mark Evans from Alpin — or is it Alpin.io? Did you guys put the io on there? Just Alpin? Okay. It’s funny with all of the weird dot ios and stuff like that. Sometimes you get a start up and it’s like, you know, they have a name and their domain name is “.io” but they call themselves “company.io”. Anyway. So thanks for joining us. I appreciate you guys being here. Love to hear a little bit about you guys and get to know you and then get to know the company. Ben, maybe start with you, talk a little bit about your background, where you’re from, what is your career like, all that kind of stuff.

 

Ben Soulier:

 

Of course. I mean starting with my, my accent, I mean my outrageous French accent if you can understand it. So I’m French. Basically, I started backmy career in IT in 2002-ish, approximately. Had been doing a bunch of stuff between, let’s say Unix, a Windows type of thing at the same moved to doing some consultancy based in Europe. So I did that in France, in, in UK and in Switzerland at last. I worked for quite a lot of Fortune 500 companies. There’s a lot of them in Switzerland actually. And  so building my career and doing really interesting things for very large-sized companies like Nestle for example, like some of those companies, all 300,000 people.

 

So very interesting challenges, technically speaking I would say. Yeah. And from there I mean always interesting of doing things here and there, meetups and those kinds of things as you know, so interacting with people, learning new things on in, I mean, knowing new people, it’s those kind of things. And what happened at that time is that Julien, one of Co founders of the company, we spent some time together and we, well having the same kind of issues all the time, you know, when you are, when you are doing that kind of job.

 

We had like basically one laptop per client so each time, a different password, all the different login to remember on those kind of stuff. And at the time, this was the beginning of the 2010s we were starting to have this, this idea of saying, man, having all of the passwords and all of that things to remember, that’s lame, that’s not very helpful. Would it be a way to actually have something that would not make you remember all of those passwords and login and just login you automatically to something?

 

And this is where I, I started just doing tech stuff, because this is what I liked — just building, putting blocks together and coming up with an idea of, Oh, I have actually your small POC of something that helps me to connect to an endpoint without a password. And that was the first glimpse of the first company we had at the time, which was called Logrr. So doing that, that’s most of the background. And from there I can probably give that, to give that to to Mark for the switch on the new product and the introduction of the new platform.

 

Basically, I’ll just to to, to say notes on that. We were also trying to build this company we did, we started to do Techstars in 2015 so we did a Techstars Barclay’s program in New York. Okay. So this program was more for Fintech. So we discuss kind of the scope of what we are doing in some ways. So we had a few at the time with Barclays and a few other big clients. They were really interested on what we do and how we do it especially. And the, even if the technology was cool and everything was working really fine, most of the issues we had at the time was, well facing is those big companies are not seeing that necessarily as something which is urgent or neither or something that it would need to implement in the next month. And for startups when you actually rolled out the product or you run a platform, you need to get things going right.

 

You can just wait, oh, oh, it’s going to be Q2 in two years. That’s great. But if we wait on you. we’ll probably be dead by then. So not really the best time to wait for that. So basically with the clients we had then we, the product we had at the time we started to look at what we have and saying, what can we do with what we have as a base? So knowing that we have a kind of a directory of users and connectors to plug to different places and so on. So what can we do on top of that? That could be, that we can sell faster, that could have some value, let’s see, in the very shorter term, right? To actually make something, and this is where Alpin is starting to take shape.

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

Nice. Mark, let’s hear about you. What’s your history? How’d you get to where you are today? How did you get involved with these guys?

 

Mark Evans:

 

So I moved to Colorado in 2010 and I had been leading a, a marketing agency in Los Angeles and that was built on kind of the foundation of work I’d done at a search engine called GoTo.com back in the early 2000s, and several of us left this search engine and started some businesses, one of which was an, and Lo and behold, it took off really well. So we started that agency and one day I woke up and said, my God, I’m leading an advertising agency. I don’t want to be doing this. I want to get more into technology. So we had developed some things internally to manage campaigns and essentially we built our own, well it was an on prem product at that point, but we SaaS-ified it and then said, hey, let’s roll this out and make it a SaaS product for running campaigns.

 

So that was my background. And when I moved to Colorado, I knew that I wanted to do something different and new. And I started getting involved in angel investing and I was at the Boomtown demo day and some of my fellow investors, I just said, hey, I’m looking for something to do. And one of them said, you have to do Logrr! taking me by the shoulders and shaking me. And Logrr was the, as Ben mentioned, the predecessor product and the predecessor company name and Logrr was really intriguing. Ben didn’t describe all it does. But in a nutshell, Logrr is a passwordless, biometric, mobile, cryptographic SSO and IAM technology. So everybody listening to this podcast is certainly familiar with the idea. And so the Logrr technology was really cool because there’s never a password, there is nothing to remember, nothing to reset, really interesting.

 

And Barclays did the pen-testing on it and took four guys, four weeks, couldn’t break the apps, couldn’t break the web app, couldn’t break anything. So it was, it was really solid. Awesome. But as Ben mentioned, great technology does not necessarily mean great success. And so I as an angel investor was looking at the companyand thinking about, you know, who are these guys and this is an interesting space and are they good people? And boy, really interesting space and really great people. So I started essentially spending almost full time working with the company. And then one day as Julien was leading the fundraising efforts, Julien said, hey, can I put you on the team slide? I said, oh wow, that’s a big move. If I go on the team slide that’s pretty, pretty much a commitment. So I thought about that, but it only was about two minutes of thinking and then said, okay, yeah, let’s do this.

 

And so we raised money and it was really under the auspices and idea that Logrr was going to be the product. And with the help of Rockies Venture Club and a number of different individual investors raised that first round. And so then I was able to come on board. The funny thing was Ben and Julien, because they are not US citizens, could not be employees of the company. So I was the first employee of the company that they had really been pushing for years. And so when we had this really great technology working well, deployed at some scale,we also discovered that as Ben said, not everybody has the urgency to deploy an SSO solution right away. And if you don’t raise a fair amount of money, then you’ve kind of set yourself up for a tough time.

 

So we said, well, Gosh, we’re pretty good knowing about security, we’re pretty good  knowing about connecting apps and users, what other things are the customers actually looking for? What do they want to solve? And the problem that we consistently heard was, we want to know what we have, number one, and then, what the heck do we do with it? Who’s using it? Is that a problem? Is it costing us extra money? Are we compliant? We have all these programs. And so as we started building out this new product that went by the clever code name of Logrr Next, we then had a massive effort to figure out the product name and pulled in all the ideas from everybody on the team. And of course ended up finding, not the marketing-driven name, but Ben came up with the name. So our technology team and lead built the product, named the product. So I’m actually not going to work here anymore. I’m just going to step back and let Ben kind of handle everything. So we switched to Alpin. Yeah.

 

Alex at Colorado Security:

 

So Mark, you said that you moved to Colorado at some point from LA. Ben, you said that you guys did Techstars in New York, were you here, but doing Techstars in New York? Or did you guys come here after? How’d you guys end up here?

 

Ben Soulier:

 

Okay, so some old background on that. So at the time I was sitting in France so working on for some clients I used to work with. And what happened is that, I mean the, the life cycles of things happening with the, those kinds of programs, all pretty short type of thing. So what basically happened is that we, we had a few calls and then we had a few meetings online just trying to understand what we do,how it works and so on. And in a matter of, I think five weeks, we got the answer saying, oh, by the way, in two months time you have to be in New York. So there was kind of the of the, of the, of the break that has to happen. And then at that point Julien was in Canada actually at the time. So he moved over there because his wife was doing a post-doc, so he was already, let’s say on the right continent, which I was not — that it’s about us.

 

Alex at Colorado Security:

 

Just a land border to cross as across as opposed to a water border.

 

Ben Soulier:

 

The funny thing at that time is that then I just, I just literally took three months away from my wife and my daughter at the time, which was four or five years old. It was really hard for her, but we were committed on, on really trying to do that. So three months immersed in the program in New York. We learned so much thing. I mean, never being part of a startup per se and working in the corporate environment is kind of different. So we learned a lot. We, we failed and we failed fast. And the other things to be able to learn to do things better and differently.

 

And by the time the program ended Julien had the chance to go back to Colorado, thanks to Brad Feld because Brad Feld at the time was really looking at issues for founders, who are part of Techstars to be able to come on board to actually be and do things in Colorado. So what he did at the time, I think if I remember everything correctly, he funded basically a program in CU with some money saying I want those guys to get a visa to be able to be in Colorado. They will give you entrepreneurship classes for the fall CU on their part time, and the rest of the time they can at least be here to actually try to do something for that. And so these took place and as Mark mentioned that for the, for the fundraising part and until the fundraising ended up, so that was already on board as you mentioned. And Julien was so already they are also, because he was working at CU and I moved April. Was it? Wow. Time is flying so fast. I think it was April last year or two years ago. I don’t even remember. Wow. I think it was, it was a from last year. Awesome. No, no, no. We are and we are in 2019 … two years ago. So yeah, my mental counter isn’t it yet set to the new year.

 

Alex at Colorado Security:

 

It does seem weird to say 2019. I’m not quite adjusted… I appreciate the fact that you list everyone is cofounders. You don’t always see that. Even if it’s, you know, you have three cofounders, it’s a cofounder but this and co-founder and CTO and CEO, things like that. Anyway, so my point is I was getting to what, what exactly are your guys’ roles in the company, Mark? It sounds like you know, you, you put yourself out of a role, you don’t have anything to do anymore. But [Mark Evans: I’m going to leave now], but what are, what do you guys do for the company?

 

Mark Evans:

 

Yeah. So Julien is the CEO. Okay. And somebody has to have that title and he focuses on, well he does a lot of stuff. He leads the fundraising effort, for example; investor relations, which for a startup is a huge amount of effort and really important. And he’s also a great mobile developer, but we don’t have mobile apps right now. So that’s nice. He’s incredibly crafty at coming up with ways to collect, organize and process data, which for us is huge because we have massive amounts of data on our customers. So that’s really, really handy for us. And he works with bringing in new organizations that are trying and deploying Alpin. And Ben is the CTO, so he leads the architecture and back end, front end all of that. And I came in because I was more of a business person with some sort of technical savvy, but I’m not a security analyst by training. I am not a coder by training. So any offers that I give to Ben to help out are rebuffed, sadly. Yeah. So that’s how we split it up. It’s a pretty straightforward thing. And then we have a team in Boulder and some people in France as well.

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

Very nice. Very nice. So, all right. So I’ve been you know, being around the bush a little bit, but, so tell me about Alpin, what, you guys talked a little bit about how you got to Alpin, but what is it that Alpin does, what problems do you guys solve? Give me the pitch.

 

Mark Evans:

 

Yeah. So it’s, it’s really, it’s really based on the needs of several different types of people within an organization solved simultaneously. So from an IT perspective and a CISO perspective, what SaaS applications are my employees using? Okay. And the problem is immense. So whenever we talk to somebody and they guess at how many applications they might have, their guesses are typically almost an order of magnitude below what the truth is. So I can tell you with some stats that our team pulled up. If you are a company of let’s say 100 to 250 people, so average might be 150 people out of that. Okay. You have about 160 SaaS applications that are in use. And most people think, oh, we have about 20 or maybe 50. Once you start getting up into let’s say 10,000 plus — and these numbers are based on our customers — 10,000 plus, our customers have over 5,000 SaaS applications that are in use.

 

And most detection of that is done either from a firewall basis where it’s what’s getting pinged, or from a financial basis of what’s getting paid. And the knowledge is not really spread. And so having a central dashboard to say, what do we have? Who is using it? When are they using it? And specifically, how were they using it? is kind of problem number one. Problem number two, once you know that? Okay, so tell me about the security implications and. I think a great example is in a G Suite environment, where it’s really, really prevalent. People sign in with G Suite and when you sign in with your Google account, you grant permissions to that application — and everybody just clicks right through, almost everybody, right? CISOs not going to click right through. [Alex at Colorado = Security: I  click through all the time.]

 

So the, the permissions that are given are really outrageous and some stuff is surprising.  Adobe Acrobat actually has full access to Gmail permission. Now, that is probably sloppy programming. It’s not a malicious and dark web, you know, they’re selling information, but my.com is a Netherlands-based, Russian-owned gaming site. And in one of our customers, 50 people had authorized my.com to get access to all of their Gmail. If that’s your director of finance or a security person or an M&A person, and who knows exactly what they’re doing. But it’s a big risk. And that’s not just G Suite because if you give Calendly access to your Outlook calendar to help you with scheduling, well that thing needs access to your calendar and what do you have in there. So just knowing — and that’s one slice of the security pie obviously– But that’s something that it’s really hard to depict that. And so we have an approach to say, here are the applications, here are the users, here are the permissions. And we’ve scored those to make it actually usable to say, well, what do I do about this? So that’s a problem that some people realize they face and some people don’t realize they face on the security side.

 

Ben Soulier:

 

Something which is really funny on, on top of what Mark was saying is that the fact that from not realizing is, is really the onboarding and the, the first access to the platform because everything is automated in terms of discovery of to those inflammation is, people then experience, let’s see, the knowledge of those applications and those things firsthand. And they just end up on the dashboard saying, wow, I was not suspecting any of that. So that’s the wow effect that’s pretty interesting in that case.

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

So when I, when you described the product and the things that you’re trying to solve, the first thing that comes to my mind is CASB — cloud access security broker. Is that a category that you would put yourselves in? And whether or not you do that, do you feel like that that is that is sort of what you’re doing? Are you guys think you’re fundamentally different from you know, a Skyhigh or a Managed Methods or you know, whoever else?

 

Mark Evans:

 

Yeah, no, we are similar to / complimentary with a CASB. CASBs typically are going to be incredibly powerful, very granular control and that comes at a cost. Sometimes monetary for sure. But in terms of configuration, deployment, set up, management, that is something that realistically takes time. And so talking with the number of folks in the CASB space — and again, you and your listeners are going to know this inside and out if you’ve researched CASBs and use them — deployment can take many months to actually get it set up and running fully. And if you want to use like a reverse or forward proxy, then it’s also kind of, hey, it’s a choke point now. So that’s, that’s a decision you have to make versus basically just APIs. So we do two things that are pretty different. Number one is we’re pretty instant-on. And number two, we display things in ways that we haven’t seen in CASBs.

 

So ours is truly a dashboard in the sense of what is there? Just give me the list, prioritized by security risk, and that’s from a what are the applications perspective. But you can also slice and dice and say, I want to see a particular user and what they’re accessing. Or I want to see, I’ve tagged a bunch of users as this is the GDPR compliance team and what kind of stuff have they used? Is their stuff even GDPR compliant? And when do they use it? So you can slice and dice things differently. But we operate really in parallel with the CASB and we don’t claim to go after the depth they have at this point. And I don’t think that’s something that we’re going to go after because it’s just, that’s an intensely high investment business to build a great CASB product.And there are a bunch of them that are really good. So we’re quick and the display of information is very usable.

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

Okay. And so it it sounds like, do you guys have  a remediation component as well? Or is it just an exploration knowledge, kind of who’s doing what kinds of stuff?

 

Mark Evans:

 

You know, it’s funny you can think of the world of applications like this in terms of dashboards that give you information, and control panels that let you actually take action. And so we’re a mix. On the dashboard side, collecting information about the different applications in use and the different users, different permissions, files being shared,email, kind of DLP-related stuff. When it comes to the control panel side, I would say here’s a good example. We are able to essentially blacklist applications and stop them with the push of a button. If you find some permissions that you don’t want to have for that my.com for example, at the push of a button, you can actually take control of that — or you can do it at a user level. From a DLP perspective, we’re more of a DLN, like a digital loss notification as opposed to, or data loss notification rather than data loss prevention at this point. That will change over the coming year. But right now it’s, it’s only a piece of it. So some of the things that we also do our like de-provisioning, so some applications we can help de-provision. So those are kind of workflows and actions that aren’t necessarily part of a CASB, might be part of another thing.

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

Okay. So, Ben, how does it work? The, I guess that’s the easiest way to get to it,right? You know, you guys mentioned that most of the time to know this sort of stuff, you’re looking at network traffic or you’re talking to your purchasing department to see, you know, who paid for what. How is it that you guys get all this information and how does the product work?

 

Ben Soulier:

 

Okay, so basically the way it works today, you have to see our platform as being so the dashboard that Mark was talking about and we have a bunch, quite a lot of integrations that we have around the applications, that you choose to integrate or not. It’s up to you to say, oh, I want to connect to, um, so the firewall is one, from an API point of view could be Salesforce, could be Box with Dropbox and any of those. It’s the big players in the SaaS market. And basically what we do is making sense of all that information in the box when it’s there. The interesting part — and I’m just going to make a small thinking of what we had with Logrr — is, what was painful with Logrr, which is not the case without Alpin, is that adding SSO for a company is usually a kill switch — you have to implement it for everyone or you don’t implement it at all.

 

In the case of Alpin, what’s interesting in that case is that we give insights and information, just monitoring and plugging into different systems, without having to interfere or to start to be put in place or in front of things that could break or that could involve additional, as Mark mentioned, set up or anything like that. We just look at streams, basically streams of information, and make sense of that to give insightful, insightful data to people to, to take them, take either actions from us or actions at a different level from the company point of view.

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

Gotcha. So it sounds like if you have some, I’ll call them, you know, sanctioned SaaS apps, right? Your company uses Salesforce.. You guys can hook into salesforce, pull data about who is doing what, you know, who has access to what. If you’re on G Suite, you could you know, plug into G Suite, I assume, and you can get that kind of data. But then it also sounds like for the ones that maybe are not sanctioned cloud apps, you know, you could plug into my firewall and say, oh, hey, where are people going? What, let’s pull that data and see what SaaS apps.

 

Ben Soulier:

 

Exactly. What we figured out just building the product alongside is that there is no such thing as having one way of getting the data. And I think only one. And that’s, that’s really what we’ve learned across the whole life cycle of the product. Which makes, I don’t remember how many, we have tens of of discovery methods today.  APIs is one, logs is another one. We can actually, and we do look at your emails in the sense of — I mean not intrusively; coming from the security world, we usually restrain ourselves just to look at the bare minimum of what we need to have to be able to make sense of something — and one of those things, for example, is your email headers. We just only look at when the mail was received, what’s the title of the email.

 

We have some machine learning type of thing that runs behind the scenes to make sense of that too to kind of trying to articulate that thing. “This person is probably paying for that” because there’s like an email saying, oh your Slack bill of that much has been received, blah blah blah. So that’s another way. And we go into multiple ways, but even with all of the mechanisms we have, we are not at 100%. And that’s the thing, is neither are any solution could be, because there’s always ways of doing it outside of the company’s network, using a hotspot or whatever. It could be the possibilities to avoid going through those kinds of platforms. So we’re just trying to have as many boxes as we can from, and just take all of that data too try to make some sense of it as a whole.

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

Nice. I would also imagine that since it is a sort of an API plugin kind of a solution. It’s probably pretty easy to set up and you know, fairly low overhead. You’re, you’re not going to, you know, send me a pizza box to put in my rack and you know, things like that.

 

Ben Soulier:

 

No we don’t sell you like Google was doing at the time, like a Google Search Box that you plug in your own network that sniffs for everything. So we have on the dashboard is pretty simple. You have an integration list, you’ll say you want to integrate that. We do either OAuth type of thing. We ask for Tokens or end points we can actually get the data from and that’s about it.

 

Mark Evans:

 

Yeah. Those discovery methods. There are 13 of them. There’s not tens, when you said tens, I’m like, wow, that’s a lot, but there’s 13 of them. But some of them are a API based, whether that’s to an individual application like a Salesforce or something that can be like an Okta on the SSO side, G Suite and O365. Then there are, essentially working in partnership with you know, a firewall or a proxy server and getting the logs from that and then processing it and just displaying the logs in a fundamentally different manner, more usable manner. And then there’s endpoint detection, whether via a browser plugin or an agent. And then there’s financial system detection. So looking at online banking or expense reporting systems or accounting systems. And we also recognize that not just security people are worried about giving too much data. The finance team might not want to integrate NetSuite with us. So that’s fine. Just dump a CSV file and we’ll analyze the CSV file and apply some intelligence to it to say what is our confidence level that this item is actually a subscription to LucidChart as opposed to something else.

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

Oh, that’s cool. So it sounds like you guys have some good base level capabilities. What is on the roadmap? I, you know, you said now you can do a, what was it, DLN, data loss notification? What, what is coming up? What else should we look for?

 

Mark Evans:

 

Yeah, I think some of the biggest things we’re looking for fit into several different categories. First category is reporting and alerting. So right now we have a bunch of canned reports and canned alerts and making them more customizable by the end customer is really useful. So I didn’t mention the cost side, but one of the things is when you start looking at applications, you find substitute applications like you’re using Basecamp and Asana and Jira. And then the second thing is, you find users who are rather different pools of the same application. You want to pool them together and do an enterprise, and then you want to know when they’re renewing. So notification of when that’s happening. So the reporting and notification center, beefing that up is one angle, just for usability. A second thing is looking at the workflow control panel angle from a, “I want to do something” and from a “checklist” perspective just to make sure that I, say, here’s somebody who’s offboarding, let’s have the checklist, let’s assign it to different people. Let’s make sure that the steps are all taken. We have a kind of an Alpha version of that, but that’s a big deal because that’s a pain point for people. So we want to solve it in a way that makes it really simple. And then from a from a detection and telling you what’s happening, perspective, building out even more integrations and more just data collection to show what people are doing so that you can forensically look back and say, hey, a week before Alex left the company, what was Alex doing in various applications? and oh, that was interesting, Alex downloaded all the contacts out of Salesforce. That’s curious. Why would Alex do that?

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

Of course I did, why wouldn’t I take all my contacts with me??

 

Mark Evans: Discovering more and more types of stuff and putting them in there as big and Ben, maybe there are some other things, not sure if I hit them all.

 

Ben Soulier:

 

That’s pretty much it. Yeah.

 

Alex at Colorado Security:

 

Cool. So what about on the, not on the product side, but as a company, you know, you guys are clearly a startup. What’s the path right now for the startup? Are you guys hiring people? Are you — as a startup, you’re probably always doing some sort of fundraising, but what does that stuff sort of look like right now?

 

Mark Evans:

 

So our team right now is, most people are in Boulder and a couple of people in France. As I mentioned before the pod started, one of our team members was in the US on a J-1 trainee visa from France and went back and is now working with us from France, which is fantastic. And we will probably hire more in the United States rather than outside the United States. We found that the benefits of being close and in the same time zone are pretty helpful. We will expand, but, but we think we’ll start that, that phase. As you mentioned, the fundraising, we’re always fundraising. Luckily right now, we’ve raised a couple of rounds and in the last round our investors were super committed to leading the a round. As we started growing and hitting some, some more metrics and as any startup does with the bumps and you know, plateaus, we’ve still been able to power upward and now looking at the next few months, we should be able to actually raise that next round and add more people.

 

And the big thing is not just a product but the customer success side of this, because there’s so much data. I mentioned, there’s so much data that we’re collecting that we have to build the tools to automatically analyze them. And in order to that, to do that, we have to manually analyze them first to figure out what the heck we’re doing and what needs to be automated. And so working with our customers to give them the insights so they can take action is a huge area for us to invest in. So those are the probably a couple of big areas where we will be hiring for in the next few months.

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

Awesome. We’re getting close to time here. I don’t know if there’s anything that you guys wanted to touch on that  I haven’t hit yet or you know, any other topics that we need to cover while we’re here?

 

Mark Evans:

 

Yeah, the big thing for me was discovering the team here doing the podcast and the, all of the people associated with it. And by that I mean, when Ben and I were looking through and listening to some of the pods previously, there is a great cast of characters that exist in Colorado. We don’t know them all and it’s just, it’s super exciting actually to be part of a community and know that there’s still so much more opportunity to make those connections and meet more people. I mean, it’s just, it’s a bunch of really solid, smart, capable people and that, that to me is just a great learning from getting exposed to this. So thank you for that.

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

You’re welcome. Appreciate you guys being here.

 

Ben Soulier:

 

Thanks for having us. It’s, I would just, I would just add on top of what Mark was saying, I mean before, before you contacted us to talk about that, I was not seeing that there is that much already people communicating and talking about those kinds of subjects. Let’s say at the state of Colorado as a whole. Yeah, it’s what I like about Colorado as a whole, as a state, because I mean I’ve been working multiple places, but Colorado is kind of a, it’s kind of a unique place in the middle of all the US in the sense that there is this community type of thing, especially on technology that I don’t necessarily found in other places. And yeah, this is really an energetic and it’s really great. And I really like being here.

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

Well, that’s great to hear. We’re glad that you guys are here. Part of the security community and Colorado. And it’s been great talking to you. I’m sure we’ll have in the show notes, but if anyone wants to find you guys, it is alpin.io correct? A L P I N  dot I O.

 

Mark Evans:

 

Indian Ocean. That’s where we’re located!

 

Alex at Colorado = Security:

 

That’s right. Ben, Mark, it’s been nice talking to you guys. Appreciate your time today. This has been Colorado = Security, and we will talk to you next time.

 

Learn more about the Colorado security scene at colorado-security.com, where you can see information about local security groups, a calendar of upcoming security events, and learn more about Colorado = Security. Reach out to Alex and Robb by emailing info@colorado-security.com. Until next time, remember, Colorado = Security.

 

If you’re looking to get more serious about SaaS, we have over a dozen ways to discover SaaS apps, along with financial, compliance, and security tools; contact us for a 10-minute demo. You’ll see how Alpin can work for you. Get started by emailing info@alpin.io.

 


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Mitchel Forney